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What’s That You Say?

People are notorious for saying things they don’t actually mean, particularly during an argument. On the flip side, saying things that have a different meaning than what’s intended is human nature and often the cause of an argument in the first place. After all, no one is a mind reader.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Cracking the Code,” from Psychology Today, March 6, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How to Be a Better Mind Reader,” from Psychology Today, Nov. 4, 2014.]

This dichotomy creates an interesting dilemma for market researchers, particularly those who invest in focus groups to get feedback on new products. Henry Ford, founder of Ford Motor Company, was famously prolific regarding customer input, having once said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse.”

Late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs also was a big proponent of not listening to customer words, but rather to their needs. He’s quoted as saying, “It’s really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.”

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Bridging the Gap Between Actual and Reported Behavior,” from UX Booth, May 19, 2013.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Why Steve Jobs Didn’t Listen to His Customers,” from The Huffington Post, Sept. 28, 2014.]

It’s also not an uncommon phenomenon that people will say what they think in writing, but not face to face. In recent years, the Internet has provided a popular forum for readers to make comments and get opinions off their chest without rankling anyone they know personally. Experts have observed that the mask of an online identity permits inhibition in a way similar to drinking alcohol. However, because people do change their behavior in different situations, it’s important not to make quick judgements. Rather, true behavior patterns reveal their consistency over time and in various situations.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “What Your Online Comments Say About You,” from The New York Times, Feb. 14, 2015.]

Sometimes when posed a direct question, you can surprise even yourself with the answer. We don’t often get interviewed in the manner of movie stars and famous athletes, but if we did, consider how you might answer pointed questions about life lessons.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Kevin Costner: What I’ve Learned,” from Esquire, April 23, 2012.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Hope Solo: What I’ve Learned,” from Esquire, accessed June 12, 2015.]

At the end of the day, one of the best ways to plan, set goals, compromise and move forward is to communicate better — with ourselves and with each other. In the financial world, we get to know our clients through face-to-face meetings, stay in touch via phone calls and emails and sometimes work with clients through written materials — questionnaires, profiles and individualized plans. Everyone has different communication preferences, but what’s important is that we discover what it is we really want to say, and mean it.

If we can help you better define your plans for the future, please reach out and communicate with us by whatever means suit you the best.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference. 

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Overthinking Retirement Income Planning

You can’t pick up a newspaper or magazine or scan Internet headlines today without seeing something about the challenges of retirement and new surveys about how unprepared people are. Yes, it’s a concern. But consider for a moment that, really, it’s a personal one.

You can solve your own concerns — you don’t have to tackle them on a national scale. To that end, break down your retirement income planning process into bite-sized steps, engage the help of financial professionals and do what’s necessary to start moving forward with planning for retirement. Then move on to the rest of your life, keeping retirement income planning on the peripheral.

When you’re actually in retirement, it’s important to stay on task but not obsess. Recognize that the first five years you may be working toward some of your long-awaited goals, like travel or starting a new venture. The important thing to bear in mind is that you probably won’t keep spending money at that same pace throughout your golden years. Those first few years you may run through some savings, but bear in mind that will eventually need to let up.

After a while, take a serious look at your retirement assets and review your budget. Is your retirement spending on track? Do you need to cut back or look at other ways to potentially increase your income?

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “5 things to think about on your journey to retirement,” from Vanguard, May 4, 2015.]

One of the keys to a successful retirement is to be realistic. If you never enjoyed golf before, that may not be the best use of your retirement years. Enjoy doing what you enjoy doing — it makes sense to keep it just that simple. If you always wanted to travel, start out by just thinking of one place you would really like to go. Focus on that trip; research it and put together a realistic budget based on how much it would cost for transportation, meals, accommodations, sightseeing, etc. It can be easier to work toward a tangible goal rather than an abstract idea.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “A Travel Planning Guide,” from BudgetYourTrip.com, accessed June 6, 2015.]

You may be familiar with the concept of creating problems that didn’t exist before by overthinking solutions or “helpful suggestions.” This is often combatted by the phrase, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” When it comes to retirement, careful and prudent saving and planning is best. The last thing you want is to not enjoy retirement because you’re too busy trying to figure how to enjoy it better.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “The impasse created by over thinking,” from PrimeTime Online, Feb. 24, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “8 Ways to Stop Over-Thinking and Find Peace in the Present Moment,” from TheMindUnleashed.com, Sept. 9, 2014.]

In a recent study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that the brain operates most efficiently when people trying to learn a basic task use only the most essential functions.

In other words, there are parts of the brain normally engaged with high-level intellectual strategizing — for which there is always a time and place. However, using these particular brain functions can be detrimental when trying to learn or complete less complex tasks.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Why Overthinking Is Holding You Back,” from Huffington Post, May 14, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Don’t Overthink It,” from The Atlantic, May 2015.]

Whatever you do, try not to overthink it.  Planning for retirement is similar to how you’ve approached every other concern throughout your life. The more concerns you’ve had, the better equipped you may be to cope and problem solve. That’s one way to turn lemons into lemonade.

Another way is to rely on financial professionals, and that’s where we can help. Contact us for guidance, and we’ll help you understand the process.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. The information is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions, nor should it be construed as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual’s situation.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Chris Hobart featured on WCNC!

Chris Hobart sat down with WCNC’s Charlotte Today hosts last week to discuss the worst and best investment decisions of 2015!! You might be surprised about what he had to say! Check out the clip here: Chris Hobart WCNC 7.10.2015

Thanks, Chris!

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Bad Behavior

Five of the world’s biggest banks recently pleaded guilty to colluding to manipulate currency and interest rate markets. Apparently, by agreeing not to buy or sell at certain times, the traders protected each other’s positions and suppressed competition in the foreign exchange market.

Collectively, these banks will pay penalties totaling $5.6 billion to the U.S. Justice Department and the Federal Reserve. But according to a Wharton professor of legal studies and business ethics, this fine represents one tenth of a percent of the daily volume of the foreign exchange market. Moreover, at least one of the banks is an admitted three-time repeat offender.

Yet in return for the guilty plea, these banks secured exemptions, waivers and settlements from regulators and are allowed to conduct business as usual going forward — and no one goes to jail.

[
CLICK HERE to read the article, “Are Financial Penalties Enough to Deter Banks’ Bad Behavior?” from Knowledge@Wharton, May 21, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Rigging of Foreign Exchange Market Makes Felons of Top Banks,” from The New York Times, May 20, 2015.]

In sports, the most recent scandal was conspired by leaders of FIFA, the governing body of the soccer world. Forty-seven indictments were levied on soccer officials and sports marketers for racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering over a time span of nearly quarter of a century. A total of 14 people — including nine senior officials with FIFA — are accused of perpetuating a corrupt scheme involving more than $150 million in bribes and kickbacks.

Just days after news of the scandal broke, FIFA president Sepp Blatter was re-elected as head of the global soccer organization. However, the 79-year-old Switzerland native stepped down four days after his re-election amid outside pressure for his inability to stop corruption in the sport.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “U.S. Indicts 14 in FIFA Corruption Inquiry,” from NPR, May 27, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “FIFA scandal: What comes after Sepp Blatter’s resignation?” from CNN, June 3, 2015.]

Meanwhile, the latest example of bad behavior in politics involves the indictment of former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert, a Republican from Illinois, who is accused of agreeing to pay $3.5 million in hush money to somebody in his hometown for a reported sex scandal. The former congressman made 15 cash withdrawals of $50,000 from bank accounts between 2010 and 2012. Then, in order to avoid the scrutiny that accompanies withdrawals of more than $10,000 at a time, he withdrew $952,000 in increments of less than $10,000 up until late 2014. When questioned why he was making the sizeable withdrawals, he responded that he didn’t trust the banking system.

Sadly, as detailed earlier in this post, that may be true; however, it’s unlikely to be his real reason.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Report: former US House Speaker allegedly paid $3.5 million to cover up a sex scandal,” from Business Insider, May 29, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Public Trust in Government: 1958-2014,” from Pew Research Center, Nov. 13, 2014.]

The thing about bad behavior is that it breeds mistrust. And trust in things like our financial system, elected government officials — and even the leaders of the sports industries where we spend much of our entertainment dollars — truly matter.

We understand that trust must be earned, and can be easily lost. That’s why we work every day to earn yours through diligence, responsiveness, knowledge and integrity. Call on us any time you need a financial professional you can count on.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. The information is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions, nor should it be construed as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual’s situation.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Chris Hobart comments on July 8 NYSE shutdown!

Chris Hobart was featured on WBT’s Charlotte’s Morning News this morning regarding the issues surrounding the NYSE yesterday. Check out the conversation between he and host Bo Thompson below!

Chris Hobart on WBT 7.9

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Chris Hobart to be featured on Charlotte Today!

Tune in to see Chris Hobart on WCNC’s Charlotte Today on Friday, July 10 at 11:00amEST to clue you in on the best and worst investment decisions you can make in 2015! You don’t want to miss this segment!

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The Business of Risk

Cyber threats have created an interesting conundrum in which the criminal perpetrators are frequently more tech savvy than those responsible for preventing their crimes or apprehending them. And the situation, at the moment, doesn’t really show signs of improving.

Several national security experts recently issued recommendations to help address the problem. They referred to the issue as a “black elephant — a dangerous crossbreed between the ‘black swan’ risk (capable of producing unexpected outcomes with enormous consequences) and the ‘elephant in the room’ (a large problem that is in plain sight).”

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “We Don’t Need a Crisis to Act Unitedly Against Cyber Threats,” from Knowledge@Wharton, June 1, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “RSA Conference: Is Hiring Hackers a New Thing?” from Adeptis Group, May 6, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Security Companies Hire Hackers, Ex-Spies to Fight Cyber Attacks,” from Bloomberg, April 14, 2015.]

While hackers certainly present a grave risk at the national level, frequently the outcomes are more personal. Sure, it’s a real blow to companies like Target and Home Depot for their data to be hacked, but ultimately it’s their customers who may suffer more relative damage.

And as great as technology is, the more we integrate it into our lives, the more risk we face of being personally “hacked.” For example, what a wonderful convenience to be able to lock and unlock our homes and cars using our cellphones, even when we’re out of town. But consider the benefit to a criminal who hacks into a person’s phone and unlocks the house and car, making for easy theft while knowing the owner isn’t home. It kind of makes the old-school, trusty German shepherd seem a bit more attractive for warding off potential burglars.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Data breaches may cost less than the security to prevent them,” from TechRepublic, April 9, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Black Hat 2014: Security experts hack home alarms, smart cars and more,” from CBS News, Aug. 6, 2014.]

Then there are the security breaches that don’t make the headlines. For example, a data breach at a local vendor that results in unauthorized charges to your bank debit card, PayPal account or other online vendor. These sporadic incidents can range in damages from a minor inconvenience to lost hours trying to identify the issue, resolve it and get your money reimbursed.

Naturally, it makes sense to protect your own data as much as possible instead of relying solely on vendor and government solutions. For example, experts recommend using a credit card instead of a debit card. Relevant to this advice, it’s a good idea to revisit any of your accounts where you may have entered your bank account or debit card information, even if you only use your credit card with those accounts. Consider what card information is stored at accounts such as Amazon, eBay, Etsy, PayPal, Netflix and other online merchants you might frequent.

And with another nod to the old-school approach, consider using cash instead of credit at places where they habitually take your credit card out of sight for a few moments (long enough to record its information) — such as at restaurants and fast-food joints.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “7 Reasons Your Debit Card Makes You a Target for Fraud,” from MagnifyMoney.com, Oct. 22, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “New ways to prevent credit-card fraud,” from Consumer Reports, May 28, 2015.]

One thing we’ve learned throughout history, no matter the threat, is that the best time to prepare for a disaster is before it occurs. This applies not only to cyber threats, but to health care screenings and creating a plan for retirement security. The more we educate ourselves and the more we plan, the more prepared we are when something unexpected occurs.

We are here to help you feel more confident in your financial strategy — now and in the future. Please give us a call.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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City Planning for a Better Future

The plight of elderly citizens tends to dominate news headlines. Topics like Medicare, Social Security, health care and long-term care are often referred to as “senior issues.” But as the larger population continues to age — and not die — many more issues will come to light, and we may even drop the word “senior” when referring to them. After all, when issues are large-scale and mainstream, they are seldom relegated to only one demographic.

Consider, for a moment, how a large population hampered by vision and mobility issues would be able to function in an environment dominated by cars. Urban cities can offer boundless challenges while rural landscapes may be marked by fewer resources and potential isolation. With America’s cities and towns facing a crossroads of serious infrastructure and public resource considerations, many are working on plans for a long-term safe and sustainable living environment.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Aging forces cities to rethink everything,” from LifeHealthPro, May 5, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How Will Boomers Reshape U.S. Cities?” from Governing.com, Sept. 2012.]

Given the attention sparked by the recent Amtrak collision in Philadelphia, transportation investment is high on the national radar. The seemingly unrelated issue of national obesity should also be part of that conversation, as the rise in weight gain is often correlated with fewer “green spaces” for daily exercise and the rise of non-walking-friendly communities in which families must drive for groceries, school, work and just about every other activity.

According to a new report by the Urban Land Institute:

  • 38% of respondents said their communities lack outdoor places for recreation
  • 54% said shopping and entertainment are not within walking distance
  • 48% said bike lanes are insufficient to make biking a practical mode of transportation
  • 25% said traffic makes it unsafe to walk in their neighborhoods
  • 21% said crime makes it unsafe to walk in their communities
[CLICK HERE to read the article/view the video, “America in an infrastructure crisis: Ray LaHood,” from CNBC, May 7, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “America in 2015: Bridging the Access Gap for Healthier Amenities,” from UrbanLand, May 7, 2015.]

Complex problems often lead to creative solutions, so this particular issue is bound to generate some out-of-the-box ideas. Many communities are trying to integrate city planning with social issues, such as income inequality, health care access and healthier living. Los Angeles has launched a plan with the objective of making 50 percent of all trips taken by city residents to be by bike, foot or public transportation by 2035. Other cities are considering how to incorporate technology and cloud computing so that all residents live in “smart homes” with the entire city interconnected. One activist has proposed urban planning with more narrow streets, like those seen in European cities, to address housing shortages and promote more Old World walking communities.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “L.A.’s New City Plan Will Make You Want to Move There,” from Our World by United Nations University, April 13, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “13 Urban Trends to Watch,” from UrbanLand, March 26, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Building streets for humans rather than cars could help solve the affordable housing crisis,” from Vox.com, May 5, 2015.]

Big problems that must be addressed by towns, cities, states and the federal government are often created by the millions of people who hopefully benefit from the solutions. Likewise, some of the individual problems that we each face are caused by those large entities. We are interconnected; creating problems and then solving them in turn.

We’re here to help relieve some of that everyday stress you may feel when tackling logistical problems. Let us help you address some of the issues that  may be of concern to you and your financial future.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Make a Long Life Worth Living

Robert Browning once wrote, “Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be.” Today, the average life expectancy in America is 81 for women and 76 for men. But those are averages. The reality is that some people will die earlier and others will live much longer. Those who live longer are not always inclined to celebrate their extended life expectancy. As they grow older, they face daily challenges, such as changes in appetite and sleeping patterns, declining health, reduced mobility, increased isolation, depression and the loss of friends, not to mention dwindling finances.

Consider these facts:

  • Today, the average retiree has only $42,000 in savings
  • Women retire with 66 percent of the retirement savings of men, live on average six years longer and have greater medical expenses
  • 80 percent of women are single during their later years of life
  • 80 percent of older adults suffer from at least one chronic condition and 50 percent have at least two
[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Rethinking Retirement in the 21st Century,” from The Huffington Post, May 1, 2015.]
[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Review: ‘Caring for Mom & Dad’ on PBS Looks at Elder Care Struggles,” from The New York Times, May 6, 2015.]
A recent study found that intellectual activities, such as playing music or reading, can help ward off Alzheimer’s by an average of nine years. Research shows that people who didn’t attend college benefit even more from such intellectual pursuits.
[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Social and Emotional Aging,” from National Center for Biotechnology Information, accessed May 8, 2015.]
Another key aspect of aging is to continue making new friends all your life, because as we get older, we begin to lose them. It’s a skill that needs to be exercised or may become latent. Social connections are important not only to ward off isolation and depression — but also to help us cope with the issues we generally face in old age, such as health problems and grief.
To this point, be sure to keep vision and hearing loss remedies (glasses and hearing aids) up to date. They’re important to retaining social connections by phone and face to face.
Make the effort to stay current with new technologies, as even these can help with visual and hearing impairments. For example, many smartphones feature voice recognition and allow you to increase font size. Don’t just ask grandchildren to program your phone; ask them to teach you how to do it yourself. Make the effort. Because technology changes so often, we need to learn each new iteration as it comes or we’ll get so far behind that we’re too intimidated to learn anymore. Technology can help keep us connected, and staying connected can enable us to live a higher quality of life.
Remember, there’s no advantage to a longer life if we no longer enjoy it.
[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Senate asks industry for aging in place technology cost savings data,” from Mobi Health News, May 7, 2015.]
[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Smart apartment technology could be future of elder care,” from ABC WFAA, May 7, 2015.]
Some studies have correlated volunteering with higher levels of physical and cognitive health, fewer depressive symptoms and a longer lifespan. Consider that you don’t have to become an entrepreneur when you’re older, but you can certainly help one. Seek out young adults with good ideas and support them with your wisdom and knowledge. Offer to help out in their shop or place of business, or look after their children while they get their idea up and running. Sure, it will help them, but more importantly it can help you.
[CLICK HERE to read, “Volunteering Work for Boomers, Seniors & Retirees,” from RetiredBrains.com, accessed May 8, 2015.]
To live a high-level quality of life, we must continue to be able to change. It’s the hardest thing to do, especially as we age. Planning and flexibility are key. We can help you with the planning part; you can work on the flexibility. As always, we’re here for you.

We are an independent financial services firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Going Global

Not everyone has the opportunity to travel. But doing so can open up a world of opportunities — not just in learning more about the world, but in expanding the way we think. Just seeing life lived in ways other than how we grew up can help us understand different perspectives.

We often criticize young adults who eschew college or delay entering the workforce because they want to travel the world and “find themselves.” However, the opportunity to experience other lands and lifestyles, without concerns like a mortgage or finding a good school district, may make many adults envious — just not the parents of graduating college students.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “3 Reasons to Skip Graduate School and Travel Instead,” from Brazen Careerist, Dec. 31, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Graduating Senior Visits 11 Countries During College, All Expenses Paid,” from Texas A&M Today, April 28, 2015.]

Traveling abroad is also a great way to flex foreign language skills. For students, this makes the two to four years spent conjugating verbs in another language seem more relevant — useful even. For older folks who travel and speak as the natives do, the mental process of thinking in one language but speaking in another is a recommended exercise in acuity. It can help the mind stay sharp and ward off dementia.

One study found that speaking another language also causes you to process information in that language. In other words, speaking in German can affect the way you think and feel.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Quiz: Which foreign language should you learn?” from The Washington Post, Feb. 26, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How the language you speak changes your view of the world” from World Economic Forum, April 28, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Seven do’s and don’ts for learning a foreign language abroad,” from British Council, Oct. 30, 2014.]

If you can’t go global, traveling within the United States can be similarly enlightening. Indeed, traveling from one end of the country to the other can expose you to wildly different views on life, politics and religion; not to mention variations in accents, fashion and entertainment. Spending a typical Saturday night with the locals could range from a Broadway play to cow tipping.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Why Do Different States Have Such Wildly Different Ideas About Government?” from Pacific Standard, Feb. 7, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “American Culture: Traditions and Customs of the United States,” from Live Science, Jan. 15, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Dunbar hits the road for inspiration,” from Seacoast Online, April 30, 2015.]

Going global isn’t always necessary to accomplish what most young folks learn when they visit foreign lands: expanding their minds. In “The Innocents Abroad,” Mark Twain wrote, “One must travel, to learn,” but there is plenty of learning that can happen in the U.S. The point is to reach outside our comfort zones and seek knowledge beyond the grasp of our couch and even our computers.

When it comes to planning for retirement, we realize that’s out of many people’s comfort zones. There is much that can’t be learned from a simple online search, particularly when it comes to tailoring knowledge and strategies to your personal situation. That’s where we come in. Please call us to help expand your mind and embrace your financial opportunities.

We are an independent financial services firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. Our firm is not permitted to offer, and no statement contained herein shall constitute, tax, legal or investment advice. Be sure to speak with qualified professionals before making any decisions about your personal situation. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. The information is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions, nor should it be construed as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual’s situation.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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