Shortlink

The Future of Globalization

There was a time, at the end of the 20th century, when globalization was celebrated. We became more connected with the rest of the world. We could communicate and share information in real time without cost, nations benefited from strong imports and exports, and companies could improve their bottom lines by utilizing lower-cost suppliers and workers throughout the world.

These days, perhaps not so much. Globalization has become a target for both opportunity and opposition, largely responsible for higher unemployment in developed nations and the protectionism movement.While exposure to different cultures, values and beliefs offers benefits, there is revitalized interest in intra-country government spending on infrastructure and employment.1

It’s easy to see why the topic of globalization would be divisive: what looks like a threat to some looks like opportunity to others. However, no matter what perspective you have, we are here for you. Let us help you stay focused on your long-term retirement income goals, regardless of global and local economic events.  

It is likely that, moving forward, globalization will be downplayed but not eliminated. Rather, at least one observer purports that countries, including the U.S., may expend more effort and resources on “regionalization” with neighboring countries.2

One negative consequence of globalization, combined with the 2007-2009 recession, was higher unemployment in the U.S. This unfortunate circumstance hit young people particularly hard.3 But interestingly, the phenomenon of young adults moving back home with their parents also is characteristic of a global trend. According to one report, the following percentages represent 15- to 29-year-olds who live with their parents in various countries:4

  • ·         Italy, 80.6%
  • ·         Greece, 76.3% 
  • ·         Slovak Republic, 76.2%
  • ·         Spain, 73.6%
  • ·         Canada, 30.9%
  • ·         Denmark, 34.3%
  • ·         Sweden, 35.1%
  • ·         United States, 32.1%5

On one hand, globalization has served to generate more jobs in certain disciplines. The phenomenon is, and will most likely continue to be, responsible for the growth of jobs for market research analysts, interpreters and translators, cartographers and customer service representatives.6

On the other hand, regardless of how many jobs renegotiated trade agreements may bring back to America, most authorities agree there won’t be nearly as many traditional manufacturing jobs as in the past. Since much assembly line work is now automated, the manufacturing jobs of the future are more likely to require technology degrees with IT skills and knowledge.7



Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Sebastian Mallaby. International Monetary Fund. December 2016. “Finance and Development: Globalization Resets.” Vol. 53, No. 4. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2016/12/mallaby.htm. Accessed Feb. 27, 2017.

2 Jonathan Web. Forbes. Dec. 21, 2016. “2017 Will Be a Year of Regionalization, Not

Deglobalization.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/jwebb/2016/12/21/2017-will-be-a-year-of-regionalization-not-deglobalization/print/. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

3 Alex Gray. World Economic Forum. Nov. 11, 2016. “Still living with your parents? You’re not alone.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/why-do-so-many-young-adults-still-live-with-their-parents-in-these-countries. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

4 Ibid.

5 Drew Desilver. Pew Research. May 24, 2016. “In the U.S. and abroad, more young adults are living with their parents.” http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/05/24/in-the-u-s-and-abroad-more-young-adults-are-living-with-their-parents/. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

6 Rob Sentz. Forbes. Sep. 27, 2016. “Three Jobs That Are Growing Because of Globalization.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/emsi/2016/09/27/three-jobs-that-are-growing-because-of-globalization/#66d3c499648c. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

7 Scott Simon. NPR. Dec. 10, 2016. “Economist Says Manufacturing Job Loss Driven by Technology, Not Globalization.” http://www.npr.org/2016/12/10/505079140/economist-says-manufacturing-job-loss-driven-by-advancing-technology-not-globali. Accessed Jan. 1, 2017.

 

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Shortlink

We use Riskalyze…..

..to make sure that your portfolio represents your comfort level, not ours. Try it for free today!

Asses Risk in Your Portfolio

Shortlink

Chris Hobart on Kiplinger.com

Thanks for the great idea, Chris!

#stocks #stocksforkids #parents #passingwealthon #meaningfulgifts

How To Give Kids Stocks In A Meaningful Way

Shortlink

Sleep and Other Surprising Economic Factors


As a result of all modern society’s demands, researchers say people are sleeping less than ever. Common sleep inhibitors include stress, alcohol consumption, smoking, lack of physical activity and excessive electronic media use.1

Sleep deprivation may be detrimental to one’s health, but there’s an economic toll as well. One recent study found that as much as 3 percent of our gross domestic product (GDP) is lost due to the collective impact of worker sleep loss (and hence, productivity).2

Another factor impacting our economy is timing. It may sound oversimplified, but the concept of “what goes up must come down” often applies to business cycles. For example, Barack Obama took office during one of the lowest points of the business cycle, so regardless of his policies there was generally no way to go but up.3

This is an interesting point, especially in a new year with a new presidential administration. Presidents are going to come and go. Business cycles are going to flourish and decline. And people are going to work and retire.

There is also a correlation between happiness and economic output, but not in the way you might think. One 2016 index showed many Western countries with high GDPs actually ranked low on the scale of happiness. There are no European countries in the top 10, the U.K. ranks 34 and the U.S. comes in at a dismal 108. What are the factors that lead to long-term happiness among citizens? Costa Rica, which is in first place, got rid of its military back in 1949 and reallocated all of that funding toward education and health care. It also produces 99 percent of its electricity from renewable sources.4

Speaking of quality of life, some cities that struggled post-recession have come to realize that beautifying their environs can improve talent recruitment for local companies. Perhaps that’s why mid-sized and small cities in the South and West that have invested in building green parks, bike lanes and cultural venues have attracted more college-educated young people.5 After all, a happy employee is usually a productive one, and productive companies produce a higher GDP.

Our goals for a confident financial future shouldn’t change based on who’s in the White House, or even if the economy is moving up or down.  Please feel free to contact us to discuss creating retirement strategies through the use of insurance products that can help you work toward your long-term retirement income goals.


Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Rand Corporation. 2016. “Why Sleep Matters: Quantifying the Economic Costs of Insufficient Sleep.” http://www.rand.org/randeurope/research/projects/the-value-of-the-sleep-economy.html. Accessed Dec. 30, 2016.

2 Ibid.

3 James DePorre. The Street. November 2016. “Rev’s Forum: 3 Factors That Will Drive the Market Action in 2017.” Dec. 28, 2016. http://realmoney.thestreet.com/articles/12/30/2016/revs-forum-3-factors-will-drive-market-action-2017. Accessed Dec 30, 2016.

4 Bert Oliver. Thought Leader. Dec. 30, 2016. “The ‘happiest’ nations in the world – what do they have in common?” http://thoughtleader.co.za/bertolivier/2016/12/30/the-happiest-nations-in-the-world-what-do-they-have-in-common/. Accessed Dec 30, 2016.

5 Richard Florida and Andrew Small. CityLab. Dec. 28, 2016. “Why Quality of Place Matters.” http://www.citylab.com/design/2016/12/why-quality-of-place-matters/509876/. Accessed Dec. 30, 2016.

 

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Shortlink

February 2017 Economic Update

Check out the video below for some great insight!  #februarymarketupdate #Q4GDP #personalincome #retailsales #presidentialelection

February 2017 Economic Update

Shortlink

Pink Tie Guys and Laugh for the Cure!

Hobart Financial Group is proud to announce Chris Hobart as a 2017 PINK TIE GUY for Susan G. Komen Charlotte!

Come out to #LaughfortheCureCLT on March 9th to celebrate with all of the PINK TIE GUYS and support the mission to end breast cancer forever!

To laugh with us on March 9th, visit: http://bit.ly/LFTCTix

Shortlink

For the Health of Marriage

Turns out marriage can do more for your heart than fill it with love. A recent study found that, among other health benefits, married people have a higher probability of surviving a stroke.1

They are also more likely to survive major surgery, have fewer heart attacks, be less likely to have advanced cancer when diagnosed and more likely to survive it longer, have a lower chance of becoming depressed and, generally, live longer than those who remain single. Scientists have put forth various reasons for these health benefits, ranging from stronger immune systems to taking fewer risks to living a healthier lifestyle.2

Financial health can also be impacted by the dynamics within a marriage. If a husband doesn’t pay the household bills, he may not appreciate how much it costs every time he leaves the hose running after he washes the car. A wife, on the other hand, may not know where the couple’s financial accounts are held or who to consult for emergency cash should her husband become incapacitated.

That’s why we believe it’s best for both spouses to be a part of the conversation when meeting with a financial advisor. It’s important to build a relationship of trust, and that can be difficult to do if one spouse is left out of meetings and annual reviews.

While marriage is often about sharing, it may also be a good idea for each spouse to establish his and her own credit history, even if they share a credit card account, as it is likely one spouse will pass before the other.3

In this situation, the deceased spouse should be removed from any jointly owned credit cards. This is one reason it can be a good idea to have individual credit histories, so the surviving spouse isn’t impacted by the loss of the deceased spouse’s credit history. An additional advantage is that a surviving spouse generally is not liable for the outstanding debt of a deceased spouse’s solo accounts.4

In the case of second and third marriages, establishing a financial relationship between both spouses is important. For example, if one spouse moves into the home of the other, it may be a good idea to get both names put on the deed.5

Health, credit and housing aside, both spouses need to understand their investments and the household net worth. It’s not enough for wives to pay the bills while husbands manage the investments, or vice versa. Ninety percent of women are responsible for managing their finances by themselves at some point in their life6 – which is particularly unfortunate if they’re forced to take on this task during retirement without a clear understanding of how to do it. 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications. 

1 Nicholas Bakalar. The New York Times. Dec. 27, 2016. “Marriage May Help You Survive a Stroke.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/well/family/marriage-may-help-you-survive-a-stroke.html?_r=0. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.

Robert H. Shmerling. Harvard Health. Nov. 30, 2016. “The health advantages of marriage.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/the-health-advantages-of-marriage-2016113010667. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.

3 Lucy Lazarony. Credit.com. Nov. 9, 2016. “Credit Matters After the Death of a Spouse.” https://www.credit.com/credit-reports/death-of-spouse-and-credit/. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.

4 Ibid.